Flat dice? Yes please!

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It’s not often that I get mesmerized by a Kickstarter campaign. If I were to analyze why that is, I could get to the conclusion rather quickly. Most projects that I had helped fund turned out to be mediocre. Add onto this the prevalence of custom miniatures that cost an arm and a leg to make, and you have the perfect reasons for being apprehensive about it. Don’t get me wrong, I love pimped out components, but they are often used to blind the backer to potential pitfalls. Be that as it may, when I see runes etched on faux bone and used as dice in Call to Adventure, I can’t help but give that title a second look.

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In Call to Adventure each player guides the exploits of a hero character to fulfill his or her destiny and obtain everlasting glory. Practically, players try to build up their collection of cards to increase their skills and boost their score in various ways.

The custom dice in Call to Adventure are two-sided and feature rune symbols that translate into values of either 0 and 1, or 1 and 2, as well as a couple of abilities. I can’t tell how it feels to throw a handful of two-sided dice, but I suppose them clacking on the table is sufficiently satisfying.

Call to Adventure seems to work around an open draft system in which the cards are obtained by either making successful dice rolls, or by matching a card’s requirements or paying experience. Experience is a currency that is generally received through abilities or as solace for failing a skill check, and which can be spent for drawing special cards or kept for points.

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The game progresses through three stages, each stage ending when a player has accumulated three story cards. So you can collect up to nine cards in total, giving you plenty of leftover time to count points and retread your hero’s story, and then probably play another round.

After looking through the draft rulebook I concluded that the game system is straightforward and robust. As far as impression goes, the card titles are descriptive, and the artwork looks very nice. These aspects make it quite easy to imagine the story that’s unfolding as you play.

The Kickstarter campaign also features an option to get the first expansion that is to be released for the game, called The Name of the Wind, which features cards with story elements from Patricks Rothfuss’ award-winning Kingslayer book series.

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